No Way Out (1950)

US 20th Century Fox DVD edition

Text below written 2020-02-22


A very strong Film Noir drama with explosive content and probably very controversial for it's time, the USA of 1949-1950 full
of race hatred, and with a young Sidney Poitier in his first film as the rookie doctor Luther Brooks and also with one of my
favourite actresses of the Film Noir genre, Linda Darnell.

When 2 prisoners with bullet injuries, the white trash brothers John and Ray (Richard Widmark), are committed to a hospital
one of them, John, dies during the medical treatment. Something brother Ray doesn't take to well, and he abuses the medical
staff and Dr. Brooks with racial remarks- When the media does it's best to put gasoline on the fire it causes race riots to erupt
in the city. Richard Widmark is disturbingly good in his portrayal of a psychopath, something that became his trademark

Young Linda (Photo: Frank Powolny, 20th Century Fox)

Yes, a fine film Noir drama and with an early attempt of describing racial hatred and race riots. A daring subject to touch
by Joseph L. Mankiewics and 20th Century Fox. Ahead of it's time.

Also, with the great Linda Darnell, one of the iconic actresses of the Film Noir genre and one who along with fellow genre
favourites as Ella Raines, Lizabeth Scott and Jane Greer were forgotten by the industry after the heydays of the genre had
passed (and she died in a fire in 1965 (the biography, see pic above, is a good read).
In this film she plays the white trash wife of the deceased prisoner John and she's very good, as is Poitier in a toned down
performance.

The film is presented in original 4:3 fullscreen rati, black & white, english mono audio with english subtitles.
Extras: Audio commentary with the King of the Film Noir commentaries - Eddie Muller, a textsheet, gallery, footage from
the premiere and a trailer. According to Muller one of the reasons that this fine noir has been forgotten is due to it's very
controversial content and that American Television was to scare to show it

 

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