Mountaintop Motel Massacre (1986)

No, there are no "Psycho" house in this film

UK 88 Films 2017 edition

Text below written 2019-05-19



A very low-budget slasher horror filmed in the northern parts of Louisiana in 1983, and finished in 1986 and with local and mostly unknown
actors. There are some grisly make-up effects but mostly the violence happens out of camera (as good gore costs more) and there are no
nudity either (with the exception of 2 wet see-through T-shirts). OK, does this make this film a boring snore?
No that is not the case as this cheap little film is interesting in other ways. It has some things going for it, as ....

The film is unusual. It has no screaming teenagers in it. The setting is interesting with a dilapidated old motel with decaying cabins placed
at the end of a dirty backroad, the story is simple but effective and curiously enough, the actors were pretty good giving some unexpected
life to their standard paper-thin slasher characters, and were not just fodder meat for the killer. Strictly B but better than many other slashers.

An old woman, Evelyn (Anna Chappell) runs a rundown Motel, The Mountaintop Motel and sometimes guests arrives, car drivers who has
lost their way or can't find any other place to stay for the night. Evelyn has been out of the mental asylum for 2 years when she, in a rage
attack, kills her daughter with a sickle, and she starts to crack, which is definitely not a good thing for her Motel guests.

There are 7 guests at the Motel: Reverend Bill (Bill Thurman, and probably the most known and recognizable actor in the film), the carpenter
Melvyn, the newly-weds Vernon and Mary, travelling salesman Al (Will Mitchell) and 2 women, Tanya and Prissy ....
and, that's before Crazy Evelyn starts to bump them off, following the orders from her dead daughter she can hear in her head

This UK DVD is presented in widescreen 1.78:1 and with an english audio 2.0 stereo. Extra: Mountaintop Motel Memories (20 minutes, 2017)
with the production designer Drew Edward Hunter, a stills gallery and a theatrical trailer

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